Friday, September 15, 2006



Angelina fibers...

are a lot of fun and I thought that I'd share with you some of their possibilities. A few of you have mentioned problems you have had with them. I'll just show you what I have found works for me.

I buy the Angelina in these little zip-lock bags for about $4. They don't look very big, but they really go a long way. I have seen the multi-packs of all different colors and think that would be fun, too. This color is called white/blaze. The first name seems to refer to the general color and the second name, the irridescent quality. There's a white/violet, white/blue. You get the idea. The Angelina is... well, a fiber. Fluffy stuff that sparkles. The fibers are bonded together using an iron. As far as I know, Angelina only sticks to itself- I think this is a pretty common misunderstanding about it. You can't just iron it onto fabric. And oh, it will stick to your iron. Use a low setting: silk/3 on my iron. When I overheat the fibers... well, it isn't hideous, but it loses the fire that I like in it and turns kinda purply.

I work with it this way: First, I spread a sheet of parchment paper out on the ironing board. Teflon ironing sheets work nice, too, but I like the inexpensive paper. I fluff out some Angelina fibers onto the paper. I like a thinner layer, best. It remains somewhat transparent that way. Layering different colors is very pretty, too. At this point, I could simply layer another piece of parchment over it and hit it with the iron or... I like to snuggle little bits of metallic thread in it or even little nubbins of fabric. (I meticulously save every bit of metallic thread clippings- and those of you that know me, know "meticulous" isn't something I often do. But that metallic thread costs a bundle and I want to get my money's worth!) I just sprinkle the thread or nubbins over the fiber, top with some more fiber and then the paper and iron it all together to make a sheet of Angelina. And it does make a solid-type sheet that I cut with my rotary cutter and use on my postcards. If you keep layering the Angelina, it will become very rigid and stiff. That can be cool, too. Sometimes I just like the sparkle of the fibers by themselves- so I just lay them on a pretty fabric and sew over them in a criss-cross fashion to get them to stay put. No ironing on the fast2fuse, I'm afraid, but worth the effect, I think. The quilter's lame looks very nice under the Angelina, I think. Lots of sparkle- and that stuff is heat-sensitive, too, so they go well in the that regard. I also applique the Angelina onto postcards- it makes nice moons and flames and such. Or just something pretty and transparent. Theoretically, Angelina is cold water washable... It seems awfully delicate to me and so I don't think I'll try it in a quilt, or anything, but it is a nice little embellishment that has lots of bling and possibilities!

5 comments:

Peni said...

Good Morning, Glory! That looks like so much fun!!! (Don't forget to take a nap.) XOXOXOXO Mom

KCQuilter said...

Thanks so much for the tutorial on Angelina! I bought some at Paducah a few years ago and STILL haven't used it in a project! Now I may have to dive in.

Isobel said...

Ihad never heard of Angelina since most of my interest lies in carving, but how pretty it is. What a talented niece I have.

Darcie said...

I love how you've taken the time to play around, experiment, and create with Angelina. I've had some since Spring Market...and well...it's holding up well in the plastic baggy! ;-)

Your postcards look gorgeous! I think you're the Queen of Fabric Art Postcards!

quiltpixie said...

THANK YOU! I'd always assumed I was doing something wrong when the fibers wouldn't fuse to fabric!